02 Aug

Quantum entanglement, science’s ‘spookiest’ phenomenon, achieved in space

Quantum entanglement, science’s ‘spookiest’ phenomenon, achieved in space

Magine is a photon, a lighting package. You are a small flash of energy that runs through the universe on its own. But you have a twin, another photon that has been closely linked since the day you were born.

No matter how far it separates from the width is a laboratory table or the scope of the universe, they respond. What happens to your sister instantly affects and vice versa.

You are like mouse brothers in “An American Tail”, torn by fate, but feeling the same feelings and singing the same song on the same bright moon.

This is the quantum entanglement. For non-physical like fantastic sounds of the mice that sing, and in fact, many physicists have problems with the phenomenon.

Albert Einstein, whose own research helped lead to quantum theory, derisively called the concept of “phantom distance action.

“The quantum entanglement seems to break some of the basic rules of standard physics are nothing can travel faster than light objects influenced by their immediate environment and scientists still can not explain how they are related particles A. unknown dimension: Power of love (it’s a joke).

Fortunately for quantum physicists, it is not always necessary to explain a phenomenon in order to use it. Ancient human conscious of friction before inventing the wheel; Doctors of medieval antibody China did not know when people began smallpox inoculation 600 years ago.

Not knowing what is behind quantum entanglement has not prevented Jian-Wei Pan, a physicist from the China University of Science and Technology in Shanghai, launch into space.

In a new study published in the journal Science, Pan and his colleagues report that they were able to produce entangled photons in a satellite in orbit at 300 miles above the planet and transmit the particles in two different ground laboratories were 750 miles, .

It is the first time that someone has generated particles intermixed in space, and represents a 10-fold increase in the distance over which the entanglement has been maintained.

“This is a really impressive achievement, and I think it’s going to be the first perhaps so many study, interesting and exciting that will be opened in particular by satellite,” said Shohini Ghose, a physicist at Wilfrid Laurier University in Canada. “Who knows, maybe there will be space race entanglements?”

There is a good reason why governments around the world could soon compete to test quantum theory in orbit, not just to claim the title “creepy.” Interlaced particles could someday be used for “quantum communication” – a great way to send secure messages that do not depend on cable, wireless signal or code.

Just like any interference with a tangled particle simply observing, it automatically affects your partner, these letters can not be cut. To listen to quantum physicists, interlaced particles could help build a “quantum Internet” lead to new types of coding and enable faster communication than light – opportunities that have a strong appeal at a time in hospitals, Credit, government agencies, including electoral systems become victims of cyber attacks.

However, until Pan and his colleagues began their experiments in space, quantum communication faces a severe limitation. The interwoven photons need cables or son to connect, but ground is needed to use a fiber optic cable to transmit a particle to its desired location.

But fibers absorb light as photons travel, so the quantum connection weakens every mile than the transmission particle. The record of the previous distance for what is known as quantum teleportation, or sending by interlaced particles, was about 140 kilometers.

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